Joy – I am looking forward to the show, love (and or lust) at the mortuary is not a common theme, what inspired you to use such a dead place as the setting?

Lincoln - I’m very interested in the idea of taboo. What makes and defines our boundaries can be so arbitrary. The mortuary is a representation of that “inbetween” place, between life and death. It really represents the grey area that I’m trying to explore.

 

Joy – Your collaborations with JackRabbit Productions are consistently hilarious – do you write with their sensibilities in mind, or are the collaborations just a happy coincidence? 

Lincoln – Luckily our sense of humour aligns really well! I don’t write with them in mind, but I guess we just have the same idea of what is funny.

 

Joy – Do you prefer working in theatre or TV? Why this preference? 

Lincoln - There’s a stock answer I often give to this question which is “whatever pays”, but honestly I have no idea. I guess I prefer whatever I’m doing at the time. At the moment I’m back in love with the theatre, it’s vulnerable and terrifying, and that’s nice.

 

Joy – Where do you see yourself, career-wise, or what do you hope to achieve 10 years from now?

Lincoln – I’d love to be able to do pretty much exactly what I’m doing, maybe at a slightly larger scale and then eventually be able to buy a small house and have a large dog.

 

Joy – What is next for you in 2019? 

Lincoln – Well I have a few things locked in for later in the year that I’m not sure I’m allowed to talk about yet and then I’m taking a little break to recalibrate, I’m having a holiday in Vancouver! My first overseas trip in years, it’s a long time coming.

A big thank-you to Lincoln and the team behind Necrophilia – on at Limelight on Oxford until 1 June, for tickets see: http://limelightonoxford.com.au/whats-on.php

This Month in Sydney

Until 25 August 2019

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Australian National Maritime Museum

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From intimate portraits to wild landscapes. Internationally-acclaimed exhibition Wildlife Photographer of the Year returns to the museum on until 25 August.

On loan from the Natural History Museum in London, these 100 extraordinary images celebrate the diversity of the natural world, from intimate animal portraits to astonishing wild landscapes.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year is the most prestigious photography event of its kind, running for more than 50 years. It has a pivotal role in providing a global platform to showcase the natural world’s most powerful and challenging imagery.